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    How to Choose Circuit Breaker Sizes for Any Application

    Identifying the right breaker for your electrical project is not only critical to your success but also prevents safety hazards and damage in the event of an overload. To choose the right one, you need to know the specifications and requirements unique to that application.

    Not sure where to start? Having a basic knowledge of circuit breaker sizes and categories will help you sort through your options.

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    Bay Power Saves Money and Energy for Oil and Gas Customers

    Electrical issues in the oil and gas industry can crop up in a variety of ways. One major concern for many companies is that old technology combined with inefficient motors that have no speed control often results in a lot of wasted energy leading to high energy costs. Since these operations are usually at the end of the electrical line, they commonly experience issues with “dirty power”: voltage variations, frequency variations, and insufficient voltage. These drops or surges in power can result in sine wave distortions or power disruptions that drive up costs and reduce system capacity.

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    Circuit Breaker Troubleshooting 101

    Tripped breaker? It happens. The question is: what do you do now? If you can’t get it back online, you’ll be stuck waiting for a repair or replacement.

    At Bay Power, our technicians are troubleshooting experts, and we’ll help you diagnose your breaker problem fast so you can get up and running again pronto.

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    Throwaway Motors: Assessing the Costs of Repair Vs. Replacement

    Do you have a strategy for dealing with electric motor failure? If not, you could be losing thousands of dollars in ineffective solutions, downtime, and employee hours. At some companies, the strategy is a simple breakpoint: anything below 50 or 75 HP gets replaced, and anything above that gets repaired. These smaller motors are often referred to as throwaway motors.

    But is there really such a thing as a throwaway motor? Is it always more cost effective to replace a smaller motor rather than repairing it?

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